Renatha Giramahoro
MSc Public Health
BLUE Fellow
|
Fall
2020
Supporting community resillience and improving education systems in refugee camps
BLUE Fellow
Fall
2020

Background

Renatha Giramahoro is a Master of Science in Public Health candidate at McGill University in Canada. She is passionate about the improvement of healthcare systems in developing countries, and the betterment of health status of the forgotten and marginalized population. Renatha was born and raised in Rwanda. She holds a bachelor's degree in Medical Laboratory Science from Oklahoma Christian University, USA. She participated in various public health related initiatives in Rwanda, Mauritania and Tanzania. Giving back to the community through the creation and implementation of innovative initiatives is what motivates Renatha to aim high and work hard. Renatha grew up in a rural area with no electricity and water. However, her life course was changed thanks to education. The opportunities that were given to her to pursue education in her home country and abroad have been the basis for a better and brighter future. There are other young girls and boys whose future can be brightened by providing them with a platform for quality education, therefore employment opportunities. Children in refugee camps are not only affected by the sudden displacements, but also the lack of a clear vision of their future. How can these future leaders, doctors, engineers, talented musicians and so on be empowered and supported to pursue their goals and dreams? What if all the school aged children in refugee camps were attending schools? How would it feel to see more resilient communities in refugee camps? All these questions have ignited in me a passion to contribute to the betterment of people in refugee camps by investing in education and employment opportunities. Thanks to the Building21 network, I got an opportunity to work on a project that aims at improving the education system in refugee camps, as well as bringing about sustainable development by supporting community resilience.

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